Wild Flowers


Perhaps I should have been a florist or a conservationist. In the past week I have seen dozens of these gorgeous wild flowers all around town. They seem to have sprouted along the edges of the many rice paddies. You can't miss them since they are so bright. I wonder what they are? A kind of lily?

OkeyDokey I'm back with the info. They are a kind of amaryllis. They appear at the time of the equinox and are called Higanbana. You can read all about them here. It's quite interesting and there's a nice picture. Although don't you think my photograph has turned out quite good? At least the focus is better than usual. I took this picture in the paddock that borders our place.

3 comments:

  1. I love Higanbana too! They look so beautiful before the harvest against the gold of the rice fields. Unfortunately it's one of those flowers we can't cut and put in a vase to enjoy :-(

    Enjoying your blog J! My creative outlet is decorating cakes but since I'm trying to cut down on sweet things I haven't done anything for ages :-( I wish it was my job so I didn't have to do the eating part!!

    Corrina (Kyushugrl)

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  2. Thanks Corrina!

    On the topic of cake decorating I recently bought (second hand) a huge Martha Stewart set - stencils and pastry bags plus hundreds of tips.

    My boy has a birthday coming up!

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  3. Higanbana is known as Surprise Lily in English. Botanical name is Lycoris radiata. Having traveled in NZ I would expect they are grown there as well. Read recently that in Japan they are planted along the side of rice paddies to keep out mice. Having seen them there and knowing that they are a native plant I had assumed that they were a natural random seed planting. Mice don't like the taste of the bulbs apparently as opposed to bulbs such as Crocus which they consider snack food at least in this Memphis, USA area. Enjoyed reading your blog. The title brought me to it as I have been seeking a blog on plants in Japan. Regards from a former Japan resident for 17 years in one of the prior centuries.

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